Malone Renovations & Construction Services

Trim & Cabinetry

Malone provides a full-range of cabinetry options, from custom builds to professional installations.

Trends in Cabinets

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  2. A new antique.
    Antique styles are in, making distressing and glazing popular finish options for cabinetry. But consider mixing it up a bit. According to Kristy McPhie of McPhie Cabinetry of Bozeman, Montana, "Many of my clients like the warmth and character of old wood, so we're seeing a lot of distressing and hand-wiping. But a new technique that I'm seeing more of is dry brushing—it's a technique where a dry brush is used in the finishing process to gives it a slight different old wood look."
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  4. Cut down on wall cabinets.
    Enjoying an open and airy kitchen doesn't necessitate having a big space. Trade out bulky wall cabinetry for other storage options and discover a lighter top-half that's anything but top-heavy. "More and more openness, with more windows, is popular," says Kristy McPhie of McPhie Cabinetry of Bozeman, Montana. "More homeowners are depending on pantries and base cabinets instead of a lot of wall cabinets."
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  6. Demand more from your hardware.
    Your interiors should work as well as your exteriors, and that extends beyond pullout drawers and cutlery drawers. "There's a higher level of expectation for drawer hardware," says Kristy McPhie of McPhie Cabinetry of Bozeman, Montana. "Self-closing, quieter mechanism are in demand. It's improved, and people are liking that." The introduction of BLUMOTION means an end to slamming drawers, thanks to a piston mechanism that engages and gradually closes the drawer."
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  8. Mission goes mod.
    French country is cool, but Mission is the style of the moment. "Mission is making a move," says Gregg Buzzelli of CKC Kitchen and Bath Design Center or Morris Plains, New Jersey. "The whole Mission push is big. Quarter-sawn oak with walnut corner pegs provides a very unique look that could put oak on the map." The wide rails and stiles contribute to a warm, geometric feel that's both modern and welcoming.
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  10. Glaze contemporary doors.
    Just because you're ditching the onlays doesn't mean you have to stick with a totally naked slab. Consider glazing. "Contemporary is coming back big, even in our suburban area," says Sharon Sherman of Thyme & Place Design of Wyckoff, New Jersey. "Homeowners want simpler lines and cleaner stuff, though glazes on a plainer door cabinet is hot. Light wood with a glaze will have a different appearance than just a stained wood door, even though you don't have details for glazing to pick up on."
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  12. Cherry continues to contend.
    It's not a new trend, but it seems to be the eternal champion—cherry. "Cherry is always going to get the nod over ever other species," says Gregg Buzzelli of CKC Kitchen and Bath Design Center or Morris Plains, New Jersey. "It's timeless; no one's ever going to look at your kitchen and say oh you did that in 2000. If you like wood, you'll love cherry, with its interesting characteristics within the graining pattern."
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  14. Embellish away.
    Plain Jane cabinets are getting gussied up, says Alan Zielinski of Better Kitchens, Inc., of Niles, Illinois. Many homeowners who "grew up with no basic architecture recognize that they want embellishments into their own home." Enkeboll mouldings, multiple crown moulding, onlays varied cabinet heights and recessed cabinetry turn a wall of cabinets into an eye-catching display.
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  16. Look to Lyptus.
    Alder, birch, ebony…sometimes it's fun to stray from the oak, maple and cherries of the world. And there's no better way to do it than with Lyptus, a sustainable wood that's making quite the splash. "It looks a lot like mahogany but at a quarter of price," says Sharon Sherman of Thyme & Place Design of Wyckoff, New Jersey. "It's a renewable source wood, as the trees regrow in three years."

Source: Kitchens.com

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